Fruit trees are for sale now! Katie and Merv have done the laborious count of how many trees of which varieties and which sizes we will have available and the website is now live for orders!

The trees will be available for collection in July (see website for details) as we have to wait for them all to drop their leaves and go dormant for the winter. That’s why they’re called ‘bare rooted’ referring to the fact that they don’t come in a pot full of soil, but rather as a skeleton tree, plucked from the ground and ready for its new home straight away.

When the trees are dormant is when it’s best to transplant them as they aren’t growing and won’t suffer from ‘transplant shock’, that is as long as their new home involves a big spacious hole full of lots of good quality compost and topped off with a good layer of mulch.

Looks like we’ve had some really good success with our summer budding this year, so we will have an even bigger range of trees available next year, fingers crossed, including more of our central Victorian hardy (i.e rootstocks grown here from seed and then grafted onto) citrus!

A successful citrus bud in the nursery
A successful citrus bud in the nursery

Early signs are that our row of citrus budded rootstock are taking well – our best results yet. This year we only have about 5-10 of our home grown citrus, but fingers crossed this lot will be happy and healthy ready for next winter and we can get more hardy citrus out into the home gardens of you folk!

In preparation for this year’s seed bed, we’ve been collecting seed of peach and nectarines, quince and soon apples and pears too.

Collecting quince seed for planting in next year's nursery
Collecting quince seed for planting in next year’s nursery

We have had a summer green manure in the plot where they will all be planted and then the lovely poo machines (Tessa’s cows) in to eat the green manure and leave their welcomed fertile deposits on top. Hugh has just been out on the tractor discing up the soil in the seed bed (thanks Hugh!!) to further prepare the soil for us to plant in spring.

The next big job will be digging up all the fruit trees, once they’ve lost their leaves and getting them ready for everyone’s orders. Until then, we continue to weed, collect seed, watch our buds patiently and ponder over the colourful transition to winter.

A double-grafted pear tree showing autumn colour in one of the varieties
A double-grafted pear tree showing autumn colour in one of the varieties