It’s that time of year again, when our thoughts turn to improving our gardens and our food security by planting some new fruit trees. 

Winter is the right time for planting, when the trees are dormant and their roots are inactive, so they’re at less risk of being damaged by being lifted from the soil in the nursery where they grew, transported (bare-rooted), and then planted in their new home.

Merv and granddaughter Lucy planting trees in a new orchard
Merv and granddaughter Lucy planting trees in a new orchard

Choosing the right variety is exciting, but always seems to be a challenge, both for first timers and experienced gardeners.

Gorgeous white-flesh heritage Fragar peaches
Gorgeous white-flesh heritage Fragar peaches

And it is tricky, because you’re (usually) choosing varieties you’re not really familiar with, so you’re not sure of when they’ll ripen, whether they’ll suit your climate, if they’re going to ripen at the same time as a similar fruit you already have in the garden, or even whether you’ll like them.

This is one of the reasons that fruit tree gardens are such a pleasure, because each autumn you get to review how your fruit trees did over summer, whether you’re getting enough – and the right types – of fruit, and make new decisions to keep improving the garden every year.

Hugh checking the quality of the nectarine crop
Hugh checking the quality of the nectarine crop

It’s a constant work in progress, and an endless source of delight. It’s easy to see why it becomes a life-long passion for lots of people.

We reckon the keys to creating food security in your own backyard come from creating a regular supply of fruit over the whole growing season (as opposed to periods of glut and scarcity), extending the harvest period as long as possible, and having as big a variety of fruit as possible.

Planting a peach tree
Planting a peach tree

So an easy way to think about your garden review and start choosing your new varieties is to ask yourself a few questions:

  1. How many months did I have fresh fruit available?
  2. Did I have glut periods where I had more fruit than I needed?
  3. Did I go through periods where I had to buy fruit because there was none ready in the garden?
  4.  Am I growing all my favourites?

Your answers will give you a great starting point for making some choices when ordering this year’s trees — look for varieties that will extend the season, ripen at the times when you are having to buy fruit, or provide you with some of your favourites.

You might have to do some clever thinking around creating microclimates if your climate doesn’t quite suit the ‘favourites’ that you’d like to plant. It’s one of the many topics we cover in our short course called Home Orchard Design, along with frost, chill factor and tree placement, just to name a few.

For locals in Victoria, fruit tree sales through Carr’s Organic Fruit Tree Nursery are currently open, and will close on June 30.

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